ALVARO SIZA: Iberian minimalism

I love the work of Siza. His projects arise as natural reactions to the physical, cultural, and, I could almost say, spiritual environment which they inhabit. He masterfully blends *vernacular architecture with minimalism to create poetic references to place while exploring issues of form and space. When I think of Siza’s work I always imagine these large spans of white-washed walls or these intricate plans where every turn and edge has been thought out. That’s part of his genius – being able to work from the largest scale of the site plan to the minute details of where the concrete meets…

ALEMANYS 5 by Anna Noguera

I’ve always been in love with new architecture that interjects with old architecture to create another being. In these buildings the charm and history of the past still remain while the appearances of modern design make the old relevant and fresh through it’s new interpretation. Barcelona based architect, Anna Noguera converted this 16th century house in Girona into two holiday apartments. In the dining seen in the photo above the thin steel casing framing the opening and the contemporary furniture beyond is a perfect example of this harmonious marriage. Below, the beauty of the placid rectilinear pond next to the…

PROJECT FEATURE: Casa BOX

Project Feature vol. 1 This 387.5 squared ft getaway on the shores of Sao Paulo was designed by Brazilian architects Alan Chu and Cristiano Kato as a maid’s quarter . The petite treasure of a building was featured in the 8th Brazilian Architecture Biennale in 2009. This often forgotten programmatic space was given a new importance in the Casa Box. The upper bedroom juts out from the large boulder adjacent to it as the kitchen grows organically below. The structure is at once modern and contextual with the use of linear forms and natural materials such as stone and wood….

The Case Study Houses

In post-war Southern California the residential housing boom inspired a group of prominent architects sponsored by Arts and Architecture Magazine to tackle what they saw as the current issues in the typical American home. Each architect was to deal with one of these problems and resolve it in the best way they saw fit using materials and methods that would be readily available and easily duplicated. The program that was to be known as the Case Study Houses ran from 1945 up until 1966. The group of architects included many of the big names of Mid-Century Modern design. These included…

DESIGN TRENDS: Bets for 2011

Casa Claudia, a Brazilian interior design magazine, asked 7 renowned designers/architects their predictions for the top trends in design for the next year. This is what they said is to come: ________________________________________________________________________________________ 1. Decorations that reflect personal history. Designer: Juliana Llussa 2. Notice the beauty in simple pieces. Designer: Heloisa Crocco 3. Flexible and dynamic interiors. Architect: Guto Requena   4. Nature takes over. Architect: Claudia Haguiara   5. Tidbits of color and humor in daily life. Designers: Caio de Medeiros & Daniela Scorza   6. Return to our roots. Architect: Regina Adorno     7. Equilibrium of man with…

EYES ON: Serpentine Pavillion

JEAN NOUVEL ROUGE This year the Serpentine Gallery commissioned French celebrity architect Jean Nouvel to design the pavilion across from the Gallery at Kensington Gardens in London. In 2000 the Gallery began the program commissioning temporary structures to be designed and implemented by well-known international architects who do not have any previous projects in England at the time of the commission. Nouvel’s pavilion is a simple architectural feat composed of several rectilinear layers covered in a red mirrored surface. The structural component is simplified and instead, the pavilion relies heavily on the use of the intense repetition of color and…

CARLO SCARPA: It’s All In The Details

(Venice 1906 – 1978 Japan) Carlo Scarpa is the architect that made me want to be an interior designer. The Italian master draws me in (every time) with his use of materials and a truly meticulous attention to detail. Every corner, every connection is resolved with the utmost sensibility. This of course means Scarpa did not leave behind an encyclopedia of projects. The ones he did however, are true jewels. In his work he would blend brass with limestone and stucco and brick. He would play with precedents of geometry such as circular Chinese openings in garden walls and corbeled pyramids in a sanctuary’s ceiling….