Marbella House by A-CERO

03/06/2012 § 3 Comments

Okay, so I’ve been magnetically attracted to the Mediterranean lately (but then again, who doesn’t love it?). While happily browsing the internet I came across images of the Spanish firm, A Cero’s, exquisite Marbella house.

On the exterior, linear planes clad in horizontal bands of stone fly over reflective ponds filled with river stones. Large irregular black-tinted windows appear like the openings to sacred tombs. And, both by night and by day, the entire place is strategically lit to accentuate the architecture.

On the interiors the minimalism continues with neutral tones and finishes accentuated by statement pieces like the amazing kitchen chandelier. In the rock garden, there are 3 spectacular root sculptures from Luminaire.

Beautiful.

ALVARO SIZA: Iberian minimalism

08/03/2011 § 3 Comments

Designer Feature vol. 5

Sports Center, Llobregat, Spain

I love the work of Siza. His projects arise as natural reactions to the physical, cultural, and, I could almost say, spiritual environment which they inhabit. He masterfully blends *vernacular architecture with minimalism to create poetic references to place while exploring issues of form and space. When I think of Siza’s work I always imagine these large spans of white-washed walls or these intricate plans where every turn and edge has been thought out. That’s part of his genius – being able to work from the largest scale of the site plan to the minute details of where the concrete meets the wood.

The following are some of my favorites of his many projects…

*vernacular architecture uses methods of construction which use locally available resources and traditions to address local needs.

Boa Nova Tea House, Matosinhos, Portugal

Boa Nova Tea House, Matosinhos, Portugal

Mimesis Museum

Mimesis Museum

Mimesis Museum

Mimesis Museum

Mimesis Museum

Mimesis Museum

Church of Marco Canaveses, Portugal

Church of Marco Canaveses, Portugal

Leca Swimming Pools, Leca da Palmeira, Portugal

Leca Swimming Pools, Leca de Palmeira, Portugal

Leca Swimming Pools, Leca da Palmeira, Portugal

Portugal Pavillion, Lisbon, Portugal

Serpentine Pavillion, London, UK

Anyang Pavillion, Korea

Anyang Pavillion, Korea

Ibere Camargo Foundation, Porto Alegre, Brasil

Ibere Camargo Foundation, Porto Alegre, Brasil

Ibere Camargo Foundation, Porto Alegre, Brasil

Ibere Camargo Foundation, Porto Alegre, Brasil

Ibere Camargo Foundation, Porto Alegre, Brasil

House in Mallorca, Spain

House in Mallorca, Spain

House in Mallorca, Spain

House in Mallorca, Spain

House in Mallorca, Spain

Serralves Museum, Oporto, Portugal

Serralves Museum

Serralves Museum

Insel Hombroich Architecture Museum, Germany 2008

ALEMANYS 5 by Anna Noguera

07/26/2011 § Leave a comment

I’ve always been in love with new architecture that interjects with old architecture to create another being. In these buildings the charm and history of the past still remain while the appearances of modern design make the old relevant and fresh through it’s new interpretation.

Barcelona based architect, Anna Noguera converted this 16th century house in Girona into two holiday apartments. In the dining seen in the photo above the thin steel casing framing the opening and the contemporary furniture beyond is a perfect example of this harmonious marriage. Below, the beauty of the placid rectilinear pond next to the ancient stone wall is so simple but elegant. The project is an exercise of balance between time and materiality.

Photos from Article @ Dezeen Mag

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Thanks for tuning in!

PROJECT FEATURE: Casa BOX

06/29/2011 § Leave a comment

Project Feature vol. 1

Casa Box by Alan Chu & Cristiano Kato - Photo Djan Chu from Archdaily

This 387.5 squared ft getaway on the shores of Sao Paulo was designed by Brazilian architects Alan Chu and Cristiano Kato as a maid’s quarter . The petite treasure of a building was featured in the 8th Brazilian Architecture Biennale in 2009.

This often forgotten programmatic space was given a new importance in the Casa Box. The upper bedroom juts out from the large boulder adjacent to it as the kitchen grows organically below. The structure is at once modern and contextual with the use of linear forms and natural materials such as stone and wood. In this not-so-humble abode the simplicity of the design establishes its elegance and beauty. Oh, and did I mention the view?

(Photography by Djan Chu from ArchDaily)

Casa Box by Alan Chu & Cristiano Kato - Photo Djan Chu from Archdaily

Casa Box by Alan Chu & Cristiano Kato - Photo Djan Chu from Archdaily

Casa Box by Alan Chu & Cristiano Kato - Photo Djan Chu from Archdaily

Casa Box by Alan Chu & Cristiano Kato - Photo Djan Chu from Archdaily

Casa Box by Alan Chu & Cristiano Kato - Photo Djan Chu from Archdaily

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The Case Study Houses

06/25/2011 § Leave a comment

In post-war Southern California the residential housing boom inspired a group of prominent architects sponsored by Arts and Architecture Magazine to tackle what they saw as the current issues in the typical American home. Each architect was to deal with one of these problems and resolve it in the best way they saw fit using materials and methods that would be readily available and easily duplicated. The program that was to be known as the Case Study Houses ran from 1945 up until 1966.

The group of architects included many of the big names of Mid-Century Modern design. These included Richard Neutra, Pierre Koenig, Charles Eames, Eero Saarinen, Rodney Walker, and JR Davidson. Many of the Houses (such as #22 on the left) were shot for the magazine by the now infamous photographer, Julias Shulman.

The Case Study Homes changed the way Americans lived and built their homes. These West Coast models were soon transported throughout the country. The Stahl residence (#22), probably the most well-known of the Case Study homes, became an icon of American design and the new optimistic “Modern” way of life.

The homes generally sought to blur the lines between inside and outside by using innovative curtain wall building technologies that would allow for wide spans of glass. By placing load-bearing steel columns on a grid on the interior of the home, the facades would be free of structural responsibilities. The floor plan of the American home was Modernized by opening up walls and blending functions into large spaces; thus the marriage of the living, dining and kitchen to create the Great Room. The architects also extended the living space to the exterior by incorporating elements such as pools, large overhangs and paved decks that would further encourage the use of the outdoor room.

House #22 by Pierre Koenig

House #22 by Pierre Koenig

House #22 by Pierre Koenig

House #22 by Pierre Koenig

House #21 by Pierre Koenig

House #21 by Pierre Koenig

House #20 by Pierre Koenig

House #20 by Pierre Koenig

House #16 by Rodney Walker

House #16 by Rodney Walker

House #9 by Eames and Saarineen

House #9 by Eames & Saarinen

House #9 Eames & Saarinen

House #8 by Charles and Ray Eames

House #8 by Charles and Ray Eames

House #8 by Charles and Ray Eames

House #7 by Thornton Abell

House #7 by Thornton Abell

House #6 by Richard Neutra

House #6 by Richard Neutra

House #5 by Whitney R. Smith

House #4 by Ralph Rapson

House #3 by Wurster & Bernardi

House #2 by Spaulding & Rex

House #1 by J.R. Davidson

MILAN: Salone del Mobile 2011

04/23/2011 § 1 Comment

Baccarat in Milan Salon Del Mobile 2011

Baccarat in Milan Salon Del Mobile 2011

EVERY YEAR IN MILAN THE MOST INNOVATIVE AND INFLUENTIAL PERSONALITIES of the design world gather for a week to contemplate the newest creations, trends and technologies. This year the event hosted by Baccarat and Veuve Cliquot was held April 12-17th. Baccarat displayed their new collection of crystal chandeliers amongst whimsical cloud installations (as seen above).

So what did all the big names in Italian design bring to the table this year?

Moroso displayed the Biknit Seating collection by Patricia Urquiola: “an exaggerated stitch pattern, an expanded, intense aesthetic transforms a weave into a visible, dramatic design.” They also showed her Klara collection of wooden chairs, Tokujin Yoshioka’s Memory chair and Doshi & Levien’s Impossible Wood chair among several other novelties.

MOROSO Klara by Patricia Urquiola

Artemide showed off Karim Rashid’s newest lighting creation, the Nearco pendant, alongside Guido Matta & Enrico Girotti’s Nuboli lamp (a translucent ceiling pendant in the shape of a cloud).

ARTEMIDE Nearco by Karim Rashid

Zanotta presented their 2011 Novelties at the show including the steel asymmetrical Lama Chair by Ludovica & Roberto Palomba alongside the twisted Elica 2576 Table that comes in a white or black high gloss finish.

ZANOTTA Lama Chaise

ZANOTTA Elica 2576

Domitalia brought to the table some beautiful new seating options with the New Retro chair by Fabrizio Batoni Design, the Playa chair also by the same designer, and the glow-in-the-dark outdoor Baba chairs by Radice Orlandini Designs.

DOMITALIA Playa chair

DOMITALIA Baba chair

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS:

RAW EDGES Plaid Bench

CASAMANIA Loop Chaise by Sophie de Vocht

MAGIS Zartan Chairs by Philippe Starck with Eugeni Quitlet

Philippe Starck collaborated with Eugeni Quitllet to create the entirely natural Zartan chair. Made of a new technology using “liquid wood” the chair is molded much like polycarbonate but fuses only with other natural materials such as fibers, wax and fish oil to create a “strong, non-toxic alternative to petroleum-based plastics”. The chair is envisioned in 5 varying finishes: bamboo, flax, hemp, jute and rattan.

SPAZIO ROSSANA Flat Table Peeled by Jo Nagasaka

Balloon Bowls by Marteen de Ceulaer

Belgian designer Marteen de Ceulaer came up with an innovative method of creating bowls by pouring dyed plaster into a balloon then placing another balloon inside it, blowing it up and allowing the plaster to dry. The result is organic as the bowls have an array of varying color, sizes and shapes in a smooth finish and irregular edges.

CASAMANIA Rememberme chairs by Tobia Juretzek

Another response towards sustainability was brought by designer Tobia Juretzek with his Rememberme chair made of old garments that would otherwise have been discarded and unused.

FUTURE TRADITIONS Paper Chairs by Lei+Christoph+Jovana

FUTURE TRADITIONS Xuan Lamp

FENDI Installation by Rowan Mersh

Watson Table by Paul Loebach

* Photos of objects in Other Highlights are (c) of Design Boom

GIO PONTI: The 20th Century’s Renaissance Man

03/16/2011 § Leave a comment

Designer Feature, vol. 4

When you think renaissance man in the world of design Gio Ponti is your guy. This man was a painter, an industrial and furniture designer, an architect and the editor and founder of the quintessential Domus (1928) and Stile magazines.Born and raised in Milan, Ponti was an advent propagandist for the love of architecture and design which he wrote of in his 1957 collection of essays Amate l’Architettura (published in english as In Praise of Architecture).

Ponti utilized Domus to openly explore diverse topics of his concern and express his personal views all the while maintaining a clever openness that established the magazine as Europe’s most influential architecture and design magazine.

Gio Ponti was in Milan around the same time as the avant garde Futurists and Group 7 were exploring their ideas for radical change. Though he was around the key figures of these movements Ponti remained focused on finding the “finite form” in design rather than revolutionizing existing dogmas. He had his own ideals of design that bloomed from Modernism but were more particularly concerned with context, comfort, function, lightness and elegance. He was an admirer of Le Corbusier and the Bauhaus but was certainly not one of those “glass box boys”, as Frank Lloyd Wright once clarified.

Villa Planchart, Caracas 1955

Villa Planchart, Caracas 1955

Villa Planchart, Caracas – This classic Modernist house was designed in 1955. Here Ponti created almost every aspect of the project from the architecture and interiors to most of the furniture and objects as well.

Villa Planchart, Caracas 1955

Villa Planchart, Caracas 1955

Villa Planchart, Caracas 1955

Villa Planchart, Caracas – The garden from this house was designed by infamous Brazilian landscape architect who often worked with Niemeyer and was responsible for the original plans of Miami Beach’s Lincoln Road and the cobblestone boardwalks of Rio de Janeiro, Burle Marx.

Model for Villa Planchart in Domus 1955

His daughter summarized Ponti’s career with the following remarks, “Sixty years of work, buildings in thirteen countries, lectures in twenty-four, twenty-five years of teaching, fifty years of editing, articles in every one of the five hundred and sixty issues of his magazines, two thousand five hundred letters dictated, two thousand letters drawn, designs for a hundred and twenty enterprises, one thousand architectural sketches. It was a great deal, and all from one man”.

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INTERIOR DESIGN:

Villa Arreaza, Caracas 1956

Villa Arreaza, Caracas 1956

Villa Arreaza, Caracas 1956

Gio Ponti Hotel in Sorrento, IT

Gio Ponti Hotel in Sorrento, IT

Gio Ponti Hotel in Sorrento, IT

Gio Ponti Hotel in Sorrento, IT

1970 Il Manifesto della Casa Adatta by Gio Ponti

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FURNITURE & INDUSTRIAL DESIGN:

Bilia Table Lamp designed 1931 by Ponti is currently under production by Fontana Arte

0024 Lighting Pendant designed in 1931 by Ponti is also currently in production by Fontana Arte

Diamond Lounge Chairs by Gio Ponti

Designed in 1953 by Gio Ponti and made in Italy for Singer & Sons this table is available on 1st Dibs for $9,750

Flatware set designed in 1960 available for purchase on 1st Dibs

Superleggera Chairs in black and white from 1957 available on 1st Dibs

Italian walnut chest by Gio Ponti from 1950’s on 1st Dibs

Rocker from the 1950’s designed by Ponti produced by Cassina

Gio Ponti in Caracas, 1954

Design Museum – Gio Ponti

1st Dibs – Gio Ponti


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